Vegan Italian Meringue

The BEST vegan Italian meringue! An eggless version of this classic meringue recipe. Made with aquafaba and sugar syrup, this meringue is stable enough to use as a topping for desserts.
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
4.79 from 14 votes
whipped Italian meringue on whisk attachment.

Now it’s possible to make all of your favourite dishes using silky sweet Italian meringue without even cracking an egg! This recipe is vegan-friendly, egg-free, dairy-free, soya-free and gluten-free! This meringue is made from a clever ingredient – aquafaba.

What is Italian meringue?

Italian meringue involves whisking your protein, aquafaba, to stiff peaks. Then hot sugar syrup is added to the mixture, which is the main difference between Italian and French meringue, which is made by whisking in regular sugar granules. The sugar syrup is heated to 240°F and then adding to the whipped aquafaba to create a stable and viscous meringue which holds it’s shape and is perfect as a topping for many desserts.

What is aquafaba?

Aquafaba is the viscous liquid leftover from cooking chickpeas or other white legumes. Sounds yucky? I thought so too, but honestly, you won’t be able to taste it at all! The flavour is completely neutral once whipped up and the substance will take on the flavour and sweetness of the sugar you’re using.

Aquafaba is an innovative alternative to using egg whites which are traditionally used for meringue recipes. It can be used to make cakes and brownies, marshmallows, meringues and many other vegan-friendly versions of classic desserts and treats!

vegan italian meringue

Ingredients overview

  • Aquafaba: This is the egg white replacer and the main ingredient for the vegan Italian meringue. It becomes light and foamy when air is incorporated, just like egg whites.
  • Caster sugar: The white sugar creates a beautifully light fluffy meringue. If you’re based in the US, it’s important to note that not all white sugar is vegan-friendly due to how it is processed. It is sometimes filtered using animal bone char. Look for vegan-friendly brands or organic sugar which doesn’t use this method of processing.
  • Cream of tartar: This is a form of tartaric acid, otherwise known as potassium bitartrate. It’s actually a bi-product of wine making and used widely in baking. This acid works as a stabiliser for the whipped aquafaba – giving a more stable and stiff end result.
  • You’ll also need some water (which I don’t usually list as an ingredient but it’s an integral part of the recipe!)
 

ingredients for eggless Italian meringue.

How to make vegan Italian meringue (with step-by-step images)

(Full ingredient quantities and instructions can be found in the recipe card at the end of this post)

Prepare the aquafaba

First you’ll want to reduce the aquafaba to increase it’s potency. This step is not always necessary, although I do recommend it as reducing the aquafaba increases it’s potency and makes the consistency a closer match to egg whites. If your aquafaba is already thick, you can skip the following step and use half the amount of aquafaba (chickpea brine) listed in the recipe.

Take a large clean bowl, making sure it’s completely dry and free of grease. Add the aquafaba and cream of tartar to a large bowl and whisk on high heat for 10 minutes until soft peaks form.

Make the sugar syrup

Add the caster sugar and water to a saucepan and gently stir. Allow the mixture to sit for a minute until the sugar dissolves into a paste. If you aren’t using a candy thermometer, take a glass and fill it halfway with water, set aside for testing the sugar syrup later.

Place the saucepan on a medium-high heat and allow the mixture to come to a simmer and bubble. DO NOT STIR the mixture throughout the entire process, just don’t be tempted – it will ruin the mix! You can use a wet pastry brush to brush down the edges if the sugar is sticking to the side of the pan – personally I haven’t found this necessary, as long as you have combined the sugar and water well before heating you should be good.

Place your candy thermometer into the syrup and continue to simmer until the mixture reaches 116°C (240°F) – about 10-12 minutes. 

Combine the sugar syrup and aquafaba

Once the sugar syrup has reached the correct temperature begin to add it to the whipped aquafaba and continue to whisk until the mixture is incorporated. Whisk the aquafaba mixture for another 5 minutes before transferring it to a piping bag fitted with a nozzle of choice. 

vegan italian meringue.

Expert tips

Use a candy thermometer

Using a candy thermometer will ensure that you get the exact temperature required to make the perfect meringue. Although it’s possible to make Italian meringue without a thermometer, it’s much easier to do it with one! You can pick up a candy thermometer for relatively cheap online like this one.

Soft ball stage

If you don’t have a candy thermometer and are happy to dive in and get to making your meringue (whilst keeping a watchful eye on it), you can use something call the soft ball method. It involves testing a small amount of the sugar syrup by adding it to cold water. The syrup should roll into a malleable ball between your fingers but you should still be able to squeeze it out of shape. The amount of time the sugar syrup takes to reach this point varies, but I would generally start testing periodically after 7 minutes, although it could take 10-15 minutes to reach this stage so you’ll need to be careful.

FAQs

Will there be a decrease in quality by using aquafaba in place of egg whites?

This is a common concern, as many of us have learned how to make and create using eggs as the protein source, it’s natural to be apprehensive about new alternatives. In short the answer is no! It just takes a little bit of practice to become familiar with aquafaba and how it performs – and even better there are hundreds, even thousands of recipes on the internet now which have already done all of the hard work of figuring it out for you 🙂

In fact, I recently visited my old college where I had studied culinary arts, and my past lecturer from there was excited to tell me that she now uses aquafaba in place of egg whites when teaching students how to make meringue.

Why use aquafaba and not egg whites?

It’s safer to eat than eggs!

Some meringues aren’t fully cooked and therefor any pathogens that are naturally present in eggs aren’t killed off during the cooking process. Aquafaba is safe to eat without cooking it first!

It’s easier to work with!

Aquafaba is much more forgiving to work with than egg whites, in that it’s almost impossible to over whisk it – unlike eggs which will separate and curdle if you over do it.

But I usually use eggs to make meringue, so why should I use aquafaba instead?

Above all else, here is the main reason why I don’t use eggs.

“Domesticated hens have been selectively bred to lay between 260 to 300 eggs a year. As a result of being genetically manipulated to produce an unnaturally large number of unnaturally large eggs, laying hens suffer from a host of crippling disorders of the reproductive tract, many of which can be fatal.” – Exert taken from peacefulprairie.org’s article  “What’s Wrong with Backyard Eggs?” which I would highly recommend reading if you’d like to learn more about the global egg industry, including backyard hens.

 

Ways to use eggless Italian meringue

Honestly, the ways in which to use this vegan Italian meringue recipe are endless. But here are some of my favourite uses for it.as a topping for brownies, baked Alaska and other desserts.

 

Related recipes

whipped Italian meringue on whisk attachment.

Vegan Italian Meringue

4.79 from 14 votes
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An eggless version of this classic meringue. Made with aquafaba and sugar syrup, this meringue is stable enough to use as a topping for desserts.
Prep Time 30 mins
Total Time 30 mins
Servings 10

EQUIPMENT

  • Electric whisk or stand mixer
  • Candy thermometer

INGREDIENTS

  • 234 g aquafaba *see notes
  • 200 g caster sugar
  • 60 ml water
  • ¼ tsp cream of tartar

INSTRUCTIONS

  • Start by reducing the aquafaba, add it to a saucepan and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat and allow it to simmer until it has reduced to half a cup in volume. After 5 minutes of simmering, check the volume by pouring the liquid into a measuring cup. If there's more than half a cup of liquid continue to simmer until it reduces to the required half cup.Pour the reduced aquafaba into a jar and refrigerate. This can be done the night before or at least one hour in advance of making the recipe.
  • Take a large clean bowl, making sure it's completely dry and free of grease. Add the aquafaba and cream of tartar to a large bowl and whisk on high speed for 10 minutes until soft peaks form.
  • Add the caster sugar and water to a saucepan, gently stir and allow the mixture to sit for a minute until the sugar dissolves into a paste.
  • Place the saucepan on a medium-high heat and allow the mixture to come to a simmer and bubble. DO NOT STIR throughout the entire process. Place your candy thermometer into the syrup and continue to simmer until the mixture reaches 116°C (240°F) - about 10-12 minutes.
  • Once the sugar syrup has reached the correct temperature begin to add it to the whipped aquafaba. Slowly drizzle in a little at a time and continue to whisk until the mixture is incorporated.
  • Whisk the aquafaba mixture for another 5 minutes before transferring it to a piping bag fitted with a nozzle of choice.
  • Use the Italian meringue as a topping for brownies, baked Alaska and other desserts.
  • You can store this meringue in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 24 hours before use.

RECIPE NOTES

*aquafaba - drain a can of unsalted chickpeas, use only the liquid part.
**I highly recommend reducing the aquafaba to thicken it as you want it to have a similar viscosity to egg whites, refer to step 1 of the recipe. If your aquafaba is already thick, you can skip this step and use half the amount (118g).
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12 thoughts on "Vegan Italian Meringue"

  1. Hi!

    I was thinking about doing this meringue tonight (it looks beautiful!) and then storing it in the fridge to decorate a pie that I’m taking to work tomorrow morning. So would you say that it keeps well in the fridge overnight? Maybe if I store it in an airtight container or a sealed piping bag?

    1. Hi Beatrice,

      Ah it would be lovely on a pie. Yes storing it like you suggested should work fine!

  2. Thank you for this very detailed recipe! I wonder… Why did you choose to reduce the aquafaba for the meringue buttercream and not for the “simple” meringue?

    1. Hi Daniela,

      I reduced the aquafaba for the buttercream version as I found that it made the mixture more stable for when the fat was introduced. I personally haven’t found it necessary to reduce the aquafaba for the regular meringue so I thought it would be one less step 🙂

  3. Will the meringue deflate if you add sugar syrup > 116 degrees? I’m asking as I want to make nougat and have not succeeded so far. I could try to let the syrup cool down to 116 degrees if that does the trick. Tried to cool down to 99 but then the sugar becomes too solid.

    1. Hi Sophie,

      I haven’t tried heating the syrup past 116 degrees to make meringue so I can’t advise on this, but I wouldn’t recommend straying away from that temperature as it’s important the recipe is followed precisely in order to get the correct result, sugar syrup can be finicky to work with.

  4. Hi Christina,
    How much buttercream does this recipe make? Would it be enough to frost a two layer 8 inch cake?
    Thank you for the recipe! 😊

  5. for whisking the aquafaba you say to whisk on ‘high heat’ is this high setting of whisk, or does bowl need to be over hot water? or on stove? I am puzzled!

    1. Hi Julia,

      Yes it is indeed supposed to say “high speed” not “heat”, I’ve amended the recipe. Thanks so much for calling this out!

  6. Thnx for the recipe. I’ve made it today the chickpeafluid became very fluffy but when i added the sugarsirop it became very runny. What did i do wrong?

    1. My pleasure 🙂

      Did you use a candy thermometer to measure the temperature before adding the sugar syrup? And was the sugar syrup added to the meringue slowly? It’s normal for the consistency to become a little less viscous once the syrup is added but it should thicken as you continue to whisk it and the mixture cools down